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To think of Norway, Denmark, Finland or Sweden is to conjure images of wooden cabins or farmhouses, vernacular reference points which continue to inspire Nordic architects today. Dominic Bradbury’s book New Nordic Houses (Thames & Hudson), features houses which are off-grid though fully self-sufficient. The common thread is the respect for nature, expressed in the choice of eco-friendly materials and a general emphasis on sustainability, with the creation of houses that are insulated to preserve energy and often warmed by green sources, from solar panels to ground-source (or geothermal) heat pumps.

ARTIC TREEHOUSE HOTEL
Rovaniemi, Finland
Architect: Studio Puisto
Photograph: © Marc Goodwin
www.arctictreehousehotel.com

Beautifully detailed exteriors are complemented by crafted interiors where materials are reduced to a modest palette of choices and finishes, reinforcing the sense of simplicity. The 21st-century Nordic cabins meet a growing need for solace, escapism and a deeper relationship with nature as an antidote to the growing pressures of the urban, digital world.

FLEINVÆR REFUGIUM
Fleinvær, Norway
Architects: TYIN Tengnestue, Rintala Eggerstsson
Photograph: © Pasi Aalto
CABIN VINDHEIM
Sjoga, Norway
Architect: Vardehaugen
Photograph: © Rasmus Norlander
FLEINVÆR REFUGIUM
Fleinvær, Norway
Architects: TYIN Tengnestue, Rintala Eggerstsson
Photograph: © Pasi Aalto
MANSHAUSEN ISLAND RESORT
Steigen, Norway
Architect: Stinessen Arkitektur
Photograph: © Steve King
FLEINVÆR REFUGIUM
Fleinvær, Norway
Architects: TYIN Tengnestue, Rintala Eggerstsson
Photograph: © Pasi Aalto

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